Te reo’s name misspelled on the latest Yellow Pages

The latest edition of the Whakatū area telephone directory lost its

Fran Chin / Stuff

The latest edition of the Whakatū area telephone directory lost its “A” three times – twice on the cover.

The Yellow Pages were left red-faced after an errant A slipped the net not once, not twice, but three times in their latest edition for the Nelson Tasman area.

Yellow spokesperson Gordy Bayne apologized for the error, which will remain on the 49,000 copies in print until the next edition is published.

Unfortunately, the error was hard to miss in the 2022 edition of the Nelson & Bays yearbook, as the Maori name for the town of Nelson, Whakatū, was written ‘Whaktū’ on both the cover and spine.

“Our yellow whānau acknowledges this disappointing spelling mistake and we absolutely apologize to Maori as well as Nelson for our mistake, Bayne said.

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Tasman resident Matt McDowell said he noticed the typo when his phone book was delivered to his address on Monday.

“Whaktū is not a Maori word. Whakamā (embarrassment) is a Maori word, and I’m pretty sure the Yellow Pages team feels that now.

The typo is present on the front, back and page 17 of the book.

Yellow added an extra step in its verification to help prevent future errors from creeping in.

Fran Chin / Stuff

Yellow added an extra step in its verification to help prevent future errors from creeping in.

Bayne said the yellow team “acknowledges, acknowledges and apologizes for the error”, and is working to correct the digital e-book, website and all digital assets, but the book will not be reprinted.

“We are by no means immune to ‘typo’ errors, but this is a first, only one and as you can imagine, we are moving forward with the release of our next books across the country, we paused for re-evidence.”

An extra layer of verification would be added to prevent future errors from creeping in.

“Yellow is committed to a multicultural and diverse workplace…we are proud to have over 11 languages ​​spoken by our yellow whānau. We ensure we have a balanced representation, and we celebrate it every day. We We’ll add another verification layer, which is Ōkupu, to provide official translations for all book names.

Barney Thomas of Ngāti Rārua Ātiawa Trust said it was a simple case of human error and people weren’t really going to get outraged, but the misspellings were nothing new.

“If it’s human error, it’s human error. However, when it comes to spelling Maori names and places, you have to be careful because it can end up meaning something completely different.

There are two accepted spellings of the word, either Whakatū or Wakatū. This was due to dialectical differences, said Thomas, similar to the difference between Wanganui and Whanganui.

Barney Thomas at a powhiri on Whakatū Marae.  He said the mistake was not one that would bother people too much, but urged caution with te reo as misspellings could lead to entirely different meanings.

MARTIN DE RUYTER/Stuff

Barney Thomas at a powhiri on Whakatū Marae. He said the mistake was not one that would bother people too much, but urged caution with te reo as misspellings could lead to entirely different meanings.

In the case of the yellow pages, the error that has crept in has no alternate meaning, but the actual meaning of the Whakatū name has been obscured.

Thomas explained that the word whakatū, to stand, referred to what is now the location of Auckland Point School, which was once part of the coastline.

“If you’ve ever cycled there, you’ll know there’s a weird wind there. They [mana whenua] used to tie the waka up there, but because of the wind they were sticking them up in the sand.

He said it was not the first time that Maori place names had been misspelled in the area, which had happened “since the 1840s”, but some had lingered longer than an annual telephone directory .

“Monaco, we knew it as Manukau, like in Northland. The place of the waders [manu kau], and you can see why when you look at the location. It’s been going on for years and years and years. »

Have you ever found similar typos or misprints in your phone book? Comment with your examples.

Calvin W. Soper