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SunLive – BOP White Pages residential books go opt-in

Yellow introduces an opt-in approach for Bay of Plenty residential white pages, whereby readers in the region will need to order a (free) book if they wish to receive a copy.

In order to make it faster and easier for consumers to find business information in the White Pages section of the Bay of Plenty Yellow Book, residential listings this year will be published in a separate White Pages residential book and will have an increase of 10%. hundred in standard font size.

All Bay of Plenty residents will continue to receive the Yellow Business Directory, delivered starting June 14 and featuring local businesses, Sarah and Adam Jamieson from BOP Plumbing and Gas, featured.

Yellow CEO Darren Linton said the change is aimed at meeting consumer preferences, with research showing digital search for residential information is on the rise, while New Zealanders tend to use printed directories more. of Yellow to find local businesses.

“Only three in ten people using yellow books search for people in the white pages section, while there has been a 20% increase in people searches on White Online over the past five years, with around two-thirds of site traffic related to people searches.

“With the majority of the paper research looking for business information, we decided to separate residential ads into their own book, which consumers can order online or by calling Yellow.

“People who want to receive the White Pages Residential book can still get it – or they keep looking online – they just have a choice of how they access the information.”

Nationwide, the yellow book continues to have high search and stable usage, which equates to an average of 9.6 million searches per month, 65% of which lead to phone calls to local businesses.

Darren says White Pages readers will now benefit from a 10% larger text size, a key factor in improving readability.

Yellow continues to expand its digital marketing solutions for the New Zealand SME community, including website creation, search engine optimization and high impact digital storytelling.

Despite the growing number of people using digital for research, not all residential listings will be separated.

“We determined this from regional research which shows where there is still a heavy reliance on white pages for household information.”

The new membership approach has been rolled out gradually in Christchurch, Waikato, Wellington, Otago, Hawke’s Bay and now Bay of Plenty.

However, residential and commercial listings will remain combined in smaller areas more prone to using yellow books – including West Coast, Whanganui, Timaru / Oamaru, Marlborough, Gisborne, Wairarapa, Manawatu, Southland, Nelson and Taranaki.

To register, Bay of Plenty residents can visit www.ypgbooks.co.nz and provide contact details. Delivery of the White Pages residential books is scheduled for July 27.


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The Yellow Pages are crazy because Darrell Lea copied his ad

Well, the Yellow Pages are not happy, Jan. They just sent Darrell Lea a cease and desist letter after the delicious chocolatier launched an ad inspired by the iconic ‘Jan Not Happy’ ad of yesteryear, featuring the cranky boss we all know and love.

Darrell Lea’s ad, which will unfortunately be withdrawn, was truly a masterful tribute to the original Yellow Pages ad. It starred Deborah Kennedy reprising her role as the cranky boss perusing the yellow pages, only to discover that Jan forgot to place an ad in the phone book (the horror). The only difference from the original ad is that this time around the boss has a packet of Darrell Lea chocolate on hand, which calms her down enough to scream “no worries Jan!” Out the window instead.

A sweet tribute to classic Australian advertising, some would say. According to Sensis (the parent company of the Yellow Pages), however, Jan and his boss were “fucked to sell chocolate” in a final betrayal by Yellow Pages fans.

“To see the Yellow Pages brand, which is iconic and trusted by many Australians, and our beloved character Jan, being used by another company for commercial purposes is a total shock to us and our customers,” said James Ciuffetelli, Executive Managing Director of Pages Jaunes. , Recount Mumbrelle.

“This ad is so popular that we think we are sharing it with the Australian people, and we think it is fair to protect it from a drop in the price to sell chocolate.”

Australians don’t seem to feel the same way, though – most of the time people seem overjoyed to see how Jan and his boss are doing after all these years. And at the end of the day, they’re doing pretty well – Darrell Lea’s commercial reveals that the couple have aged extraordinarily well.

I mean, the original ad aired in the year 2000, and almost two decades later Deborah Kennedy looks almost exactly the same. Unlike the yellow pages.

Regardless, Darrell Lea has agreed to take the ad down, but for now you can still see it (along with the original) below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPOO0emzAaY



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Darrell Lea cancels ‘No Worries Jan’ ad after Yellow Pages legal threats

Darrell Lea has canceled his “No Worries Jan” campaign, which made headlines after the Yellow Pages – the brand behind the iconic “Not Happy Jan” advertising campaign of the early 2000s – yesterday published a letter from cessation and abstention.

The confectionery company said in a statement titled “No Worries Sensis !!” that if he is “disappointed” Sensis has issued the legal threat, he will cancel the ads and send “a big box of chocolate their way”.

“We wanted to celebrate a classic Australian TV commercial and give it a modern twist,” the statement said.

“As an Australian company with a 92 year heritage, we wanted to breathe new life into iconic advertising and based on the feedback we have received the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

ADVERTISING

“However, Sensis demanded that we stop our campaign through its lawyers.”

This was the first campaign created by Akkomplice for Darrell Lea, after the creative agency won the account earlier this month. The redesigned ‘Jan’ campaign aimed to relaunch the Australian confectionery brand to the market after taking office in 2012.

Darrell Lea noted in his statement that at first Sensis seemed to enjoy the publicity.

“We were especially thrilled when the Sensis social media team posted their support for our announcement on their social media channels. [on Wednesday 29 May]. “

But yesterday, Yellow Pages executive managing director James Ciuffetelli said that seeing Darrell Lea using the Jan concept was a “total shock to us and our customers,” which led Sensis to send out a cease and desist letter. abstention to CEO Darrell Lea, Tim York, major TV channels and Akkomplice, demanding that the ads be removed.

“It’s important for advertisers and agencies to protect their work, creativity and innovation. This ad is so popular that we think we are sharing it with the Australian people, and we think it is fair to protect it from a drop in the price to sell chocolate, ”he said.

Pages Jaunes does not have a trademark for the slogan “Not Happy Jan”, and has highlighted the argument that Darrell Lea’s campaign “is misleading consumers”, leading some to believe that Pages Jaunes was involved in the campaign. advertising.

However, despite the tumultuous week, Darrell Lea hinted that something new is coming soon: “To Australian consumers who love a new take on life, we say – stay tuned.”


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Yellow Pages orders Darrell Lea to withdraw chocolate ad that copies iconic ad

“Not happy, Jan! Yellow Pages orders Darrell Lea to withdraw chocolate ad that paid homage to iconic ad

  • Darrell Lea hit by Yellow Pages lawyers ceasefire
  • The Australian chocolate maker has remade the iconic advertising of the Pages identically
  • Call Directory Accused Darrell Lea of ​​”Turning Down Their Advertising to Sell Chocolate”

The Yellow Pages had ordered Darrell Lea to withdraw their ad that reflects their iconic “Not Happy, Jan!” commercial.

The Australian chocolate company was hit on Thursday with a cease and desist order from Sensis, the parent company of the Yellow Pages.

Yellow executive general manager James Ciuffetelli said their ad was “cheaper to sell chocolate.”

Darrell Lea posted an ad on Tuesday that was the same as the 2000 original with the same actress.

It’s the same story, except the manager yells “No worries, Jan!” After eating chocolate.

“It has been used without our consultation or approval,” Ciuffetelli said.

“To see the Yellow Pages brand, which is iconic and trusted by many Australians, and our beloved character Jan, being used by another company for commercial purposes is a total shock to us.

“By imitating our advertising, we believe it is misleading for consumers.

“It’s clear on social media that a number of people believe the Yellow Pages approved of this campaign, which they haven’t.”

Darrell Lea accused the Sensis media team of going back after initially “posting their support for our announcement on their social media channels yesterday.”

REMAKE: New version of Jan appears in Darrell Lea's remake of iconic commercial

“To see our beloved character Jan (pictured) being used by another company for commercial purposes is a total shock to us,” said James Ciuffetelli, executive general manager of Yellow.

Darrell Lea’s marketing director, Tim Stanford, said he was “disappointed” with the response.

“As an Australian company with a 92 year heritage, we wanted to breathe new life into an iconic ad and based on the feedback we have received the response has been overwhelmingly positive,” said Stanford.

“However, today Sensis demanded that we stop our campaign through its lawyers.

“In the mind of Darrell Lea ‘Makes It Better’, we’ll cancel the ads and send a big box of chocolate their way.”

The ad has 117,000 views on Darrell Lea’s Facebook page at the time of this article’s publication.

The confectionery giant has until 5 p.m. Friday to withdraw the ad.

ORIGINAL: The boss (pictured) gets angry at an employee and yells

ORIGINAL: The boss (pictured) gets angry at an employee and yells “not happy, Jan” in the original ad

REMAKE: Darrell's version Lea sees boss eating chocolate to calm himself down before saying

REMAKE: Darrell’s version Lea sees the boss eating chocolate to calm himself down before saying “no worries, Jan!” The same actress was used as the original

Publicity


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Kerala Woman Turns Husband’s Passport Into Phone Book And ‘Jugaad’ Gone Wrong

indian passport is one of the most powerful and important travel documents. It also consists of 36 or 60 blank pages which are stamped when the holder applies for a visa. Now a video has gone unbelievably viral where a man from Kerala shows his passport turned into a phone book. Yes, you heard us right! The man’s wife decided to use her husband’s old passport to write down important numbers. Not only that, but it also has essential details like a shopping list.Also Read – OCI Card Holders No Longer Required To Carry Old Passports To Travel To India

Well, the video is proof of the perfect ‘jugaad’ that Indians are famous for. However, the damage came to the husband from his wife and he was shocked after finding out. The video is hilarious and it will leave you smacked. Read also – Passport application: what the police are checking | All you need to know

The video was shared by the passport holder’s son and it gets interesting as the pages unfold in the video. The video shows the total of some of the purchased products noted for the calculation. Read also – Lotus symbol on passport: MEA declares part of security function, Congress calls it “saffronization”

Check it out here:

The video is breaking the internet, and netizens have responded with hilarious comments as well. One user wrote: “This only happens in India. While the other wrote: “Truly Indian. “

Passports being the most valid document are the most basic proof of identity and citizenship. Even old passports are useful in many ways. While it’s not a good idea to forge the passport, this woman’s idea of ​​turning it into a phone book is bizarre but hilarious.


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Kerala Woman turns passport into phone book and shopping list

If there was a college course on jugaad ‘, I’m pretty sure the Indians would have passed it! Because sometimes logic pauses when we face a crisis. Remember the Uber driver who used a magnifying mirror as a rearview mirror? Turns out it wasn’t as far as desi people can go!

A woman from Kerala used her husband’s passport to record her phone numbers and make shopping lists!

Image source

Mothers generally tend to save everything on paper no matter how advanced our technology has become where everything can be saved and retrieved on your phone.

You will always find a diary or notebook filled with black, blue and red ink somewhere in the house filled with numbers and somehow a lot of bills between the pages!

Image source

However, this Kerala man posted a video on Facebook showing how his mother used her husband’s passport instead of a diary.

The video shows an ordinary passport in all its glory, but as the pages are turned… boom! It’s a phone book.

Image source

The video doesn’t end there. The woman saved the best for last – made shopping lists towards the last pages!

Image source

Watch the video here:

https://www.facebook.com/ricky.bhinder.52/videos/374110856512004/

Imagine traveling somewhere and showing that passport to airport officials!


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The final yellow pages phone book marks the end of the Yell.com era and online movement

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With nearly a billion copies printed in its 53 years of operation, the last copy of the Yellow Pages was delivered to Brighton on Friday; the city where it all began in 1966.

The Yellow Pages – the UK’s leading telephone directory and a staple in British household history – has now moved to Yell.com, becoming a fully online business.

RICKY MCINTOSH / NEWSGetty Images

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Actor and Cold feet Star James Nesbitt, who has been the star of some of the Yellow Pages’ most famous commercials, visited two companies that have been advertising the book since the very first issue and delivered the final edition to some Brighton people & Hove Friday (January 18).

Since their launch five decades ago, the once-bulky Yellow Pages (famous in equal parts for their size and color) have been delivered to over 27 million UK homes with 104 editions tailored to specific regions of the country.

yellow pages first cover issue of 1966 and last issue of 2019

As a popular way for consumers to search and find local businesses, more than a million independent businesses – from local hairdressers and plumbers to artificial eye dealers – have advertised in the famous yellow book at during its broadcast.

“Almost every household, including mine, had one near their phone” – James Nesbitt

It was in September 2017 that Yell announced the last printing cycle of the Yellow Pages. The first of 104 final editions was distributed in Kingston in January 2018, and the final edition of the story was distributed this month in Brighton, where it all began.

Now, after more than half a century, Yell, owned by the Hibu Group, said it was “the right time” to stop print publishing. Yell is now committed to helping “a million businesses be found, chosen and trusted” by more customers online by 2020.

Yell.com website

Yell

“The book itself will no doubt be remembered, and after over 50 years we are extremely proud to say that we still have clients who have been with us since the very first directory, and are now with us online. “said Richard Hanscott, Executive Chef of Yell. “While the farewells can be difficult, we felt it was a good time to end the yellow pages and we look forward to pursuing our future online at Yell.com. “

But Yellow Pages was just as popular for its advertisements as the Yellow Book itself.

James Nesbitt and Richard Hanscott, CEO of Yell - Last day of the Yellow Pages
Hanscott (left) and Nesbitt (right)

Yell

The Yellow Pages brand was behind some of the most memorable television commercials, including “French Polishers”, “JR Hartley’s Fly Fishing” and the 2003 campaign starring James Nesbitt as Adam.

Nesbitt said he was “truly honored to have played a role in the final delivery” of the iconic phone book.

James Nesbitt delivers last copies of the Yellow Pages

Yell

“I had a great time chatting with Yell’s two oldest customers and delivering the last few to the city of Brighton,” Nesbitt said. “The Yellow Pages are such an iconic piece of history – almost every household, including mine, had one near their phone, and it helped us connect with local businesses in our towns and villages.”


OUR SELECTION OF THE MOST POPULAR YELLOW PAGES TV ADS

    1. JR Hartley (1983)

    2. French polishers (1991)

    3. Haircut (2003)


    THE YELLOW PAGES: KEY DATES

    • 1966 – First yellow pages published
    • 1976 – The Yellow Pages are rolled out across the UK
    • 1988 – The electronic yellow pages are born
    • 1996 – Yell.co.uk is launched
    • 2016 – The Yellow Pages turns 50
    • 2019 – Final edition of the Yellow Pages distributed

      This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported to this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and other similar content on piano.io


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      Yellow Pages Famous For Memorable Ads Deliver Final Copies As They Go Digital

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      End of the yellow pages: The phone book famous for its memorable ads provides the final copies as it goes digital

      • The final copies were delivered yesterday as the publisher went fully digital
      • Were handed over by actor James Nesbitt in Brighton where it was first printed
      • He starred in several of the brand’s most memorable commercials, including in 2003










      For decades it could be found on the shelves of just about every home in Britain.

      But the number is finally available for the Yellow Pages – once the go-to directory for everything from accountants to zoos.

      The final copies were delivered yesterday as the publisher went entirely digital. They were presented by Cold Feet actor James Nesbitt, who starred in several of the brand’s most memorable commercials, in Brighton where it was first printed in 1966.

      The final copies were delivered yesterday as the publisher went entirely digital. They were presented by Cold Feet actor James Nesbitt (pictured)

      Nesbitt's commercials include a scene where he frantically searches for a barber after doing a horrible job cutting his niece's hair (pictured)

      Nesbitt’s commercials include a scene where he frantically searches for a barber after doing a horrible job cutting his niece’s hair (pictured)

      Speaking yesterday, Nesbitt said: “The Yellow Pages have helped me a lot in my career.  You wouldn't think you would get such recognition by doing a few silly ads, but they really stuck with people.

      Speaking yesterday, Nesbitt said: “The Yellow Pages have helped me a lot in my career. You wouldn’t think you would get such recognition by doing a few silly ads, but they really stuck with people.

      Among those who received a copy, there were two companies that had been advertising in the phone book from the first number. Since then, one billion copies have been printed on one trillion pages and distributed to 27 million addresses nationwide.

      The first book was published by La Poste, and today there are 104 editions for different fields.

      Nesbitt, whose commercials include a scene where he frantically searches for a hairdresser after doing a horrible job cutting his niece’s hair, said: “The Yellow Pages have been very good for me in my career. You wouldn’t think you would get such recognition by doing a few silly ads, but they really stuck with people.

      His appearances weren’t the only ones to find an audience. The mini-story starring Norman Lumsden as the man who finds a rare copy of a fly fishing book in the yellow pages before revealing he is author, JR Hartley, has been elected Britain’s fifth most popular commercial in 2015. It made such a mark after it first aired in 1983 that a fishing book subsequently written under the name became a bestseller.

      On the button: In addition to its color, Pages Jaunes was known for its slogan and logo, which was never registered and is used worldwide (advertisement published in 1970)

      On the button: In addition to its color, Pages Jaunes was known for its slogan and logo, which was never registered and is used worldwide (advertisement published in 1970)

      A nice catch: actor Norman Lumsden uses the Yellow Pages to trace a copy of a book on fly fishing revealing only at the end that he is the author, JR Hartley (advertisement published in 1983)

      A nice catch: Actor Norman Lumsden uses the yellow pages to trace a copy of a book on fly fishing – revealing only at the end that he is the author, JR Hartley (commercial published in 1983)

      Close call: In the absence of his parents, a teenager throws a party at which a precious table is scraped.  He is saved by calling a furniture restorer in the directory (advertisement published in 1991)

      Close call: In the absence of his parents, a teenager throws a party at which a precious table is scraped. He is saved by calling a furniture restorer in the directory (advertisement published in 1991)

      Over the years, the directory has become useful for more than just telephone numbers – its size has enabled it to serve many purposes. Nesbitt joked, “They were part of the furniture. My mom hit me with one. My girlfriend hit me with one. It was useful for all kinds of things.

      In a Christmas advertisement that aired in 1992, a little boy stands on yellow pages so he can kiss a girl under the mistletoe.

      But this trick would make little difference to a boy’s height these days. The size of the famous book is drastically reduced as more businesses switch to online advertising and build their own websites. The yellow pages can now be found online operated by the marketing company Yell.

      Managing Director Richard Hanscott said yesterday: “It is with a hint of sadness that we are distributing the last copies, but we felt it was the right time to focus on digital.”

      Advertising


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      Dungog and District Telephone Directory 2018-19 | Chronicle of Dungog

      Everyone will read it – the new local Dungog and District phone book came out today.

      Keeping all of your contacts for Dungog and the surrounding neighborhoods in one place has never been easier.

      today Chronicle of Dungog comes with a free copy of the Dungog and District Local Telephone Directory 2018-19.

      The special 116-page Fairfax Regional Media publication continues years of tradition for the local community, providing access to all phone numbers for businesses, community organizations and homes in one convenient location.

      This marks the 28e year of this popular directory, which is updated annually.

      It presents an easy to use index with a complete list of products and services in the neighborhood.

      All phone numbers are listed alphabetically in large, easy-to-read print.

      The purpose of the directory is twofold – to provide information on businesses, community and sports organizations and to provide all local phone numbers in larger print for easier and faster reference, not lost among thousands of other entries in a large repertoire.

      There is an A to Z list of municipal services, a list of justices of the peace, local emergency numbers and a community directory.

      Make sure to grab your copy of the directory for free with the the Chronicle or at selected outlets across the district in the coming weeks, including the Dowling Street Visitor Information Center.


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      Looking for the blank pages? You’ll need to call – Business – The Florida Times-Union

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      AT&T recalls the distribution of its white pages in Florida – a long time ago.

      The annual yellow pages still pop up on doorsteps this summer as always, but not the white pages phone book. Instead, AT&T will send the White Pages directory with residential phone number lists only to people who call a toll-free number and request it.

      Those who request the white pages will always receive them for free. But based on similar programs in Atlanta and Austin, Texas, the requests won’t jam the phone lines.

      As of November, requests for white pages in Atlanta have accounted for about 1% of previously distributed phone books, according to the company. For Austin, the demand rate is just over 2%.

      The Florida Civil Service Commission agreed last month to give AT&T a two-year trial period for the new delivery method. The commission waived a rule that requires AT&T to send directories of local residential telephone numbers to all customers. During the trial, the state will collect customer feedback and then determine whether the exemption should be extended or revert to the old automatic distribution mode.

      AT&T spokesperson Sage Rhodes said on Tuesday that the new approach highlights customer choice. People can still get the phone book by ordering it, or they can choose to go online at sites operated by the company. Another option is to use an AT&T compact disc to download the full directory.

      In addition, many smartphones such as the Blackberry and the iPhone allow access to the white and yellow pages through free mobile applications.

      Although the white pages turn black, AT&T continues to deliver its yellow pages widely to customer doors.

      This year’s Jacksonville Yellow Pages has a directory of phone numbers for local businesses and a blue pages section of government numbers.

      The Jacksonville Yellow Pages also have sections compiling both business and residential numbers for several areas – Baldwin, Jacksonville Beaches, Maxville-Middleburg, Orange Park, Yulee, Callahan, and Macclenny.

      What is missing ? Residential telephone numbers for Jacksonville, which occupy approximately 600 pages in a white pages telephone directory.

      The Civil Service Commission said reducing the number of these phone books would reduce waste and be environmentally friendly.

      One point of discussion during the committee’s vote was whether AT&T would be able to charge for the white pages phone book or the compact disc if the state stops requiring distribution to all customers.

      Commission spokesperson Todd Brown said it was a “big if”.

      “If that were to happen, it would be much further,” he said. “At this point, we’re still talking about free white pages. You have to take the extra step of calling [to order it] instead of appearing at your doorstep. “

      For people who do not have access to computers, making the call to order the phone book would save money in this regard – they would not have to rely on directory assistance when doing so. need a local home phone number.

      In Florida, the directory assistance charge is $ 1.50 if you are calling from a landline. For cell phones, the nationwide directory assistance charge is $ 1.99.

      [email protected],
      (904) 359-4581


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