Monkeypox Vaccine – Student Life Guide

The University at Buffalo has been closely monitoring the monkeypox situation for several weeks and is taking proactive steps to respond as needed to keep the UB community safe.

Although the risk to members of the University community is low, as a precaution, UB’s Health and Safety Committee is developing a preparedness and response plan, with guidance from infectious disease experts at UB. university and county health department. UB Student Health Services remains vigilant for the possibility of monkeypox, using guidance from public health authorities for testing, treatment, and infection prevention and control.

The university takes very seriously its obligations and commitment to providing a safe and secure environment for all members of our university community, as well as visitors to our campuses. UB officials, in partnership with local and national public health officials, have taken steps to prepare for the potential of monkeypox within the university community, including:

  • Continuous monitoring of CDC advisories on monkeypox.
  • Ongoing coordination with other campus groups, SUNY, ECDOH and NYSDOH.
  • Assess and reinforce infection control measures and equipment.
  • Raising awareness in the UB community regarding preventive measures and how to monitor for possible symptoms.
  • Proactive planning on how to handle a potential exposure or suspected case of monkeypox virus.

UB continues to encourage students, employees and visitors to wash their hands regularly, to avoid contact with people who appear ill, and to see their doctor or contact student health services if they experience a rash. new or unexplained skin or other symptoms. According to the CDC, human-to-human transmission of monkeypox virus occurs through direct contact with lesions or infected bodily fluids, or through exposure to respiratory secretions during prolonged face-to-face contact. A person is considered contagious until the rash has completely healed and a new layer of skin has formed. This may take several weeks. Researchers are still trying to figure out if the virus can spread from someone who has no symptoms. Remember: monkeypox is rare. Whatever the cause of your symptoms, prompt medical attention is important for your well-being and to protect others.

As the situation evolves, the university will continue to communicate with the university community regarding the need to monitor its own health and the importance of preventive measures.

UB has experience in the treatment of infectious diseases and has been closely monitoring the monkeypox situation for several weeks.

The university takes proactive measures to keep the UB community safe. UB’s health and safety committee is developing a preparedness and response plan, with guidance from infectious disease experts from the university and the county health department. UB Student Health Services remains vigilant for the possibility of monkeypox, using guidance from public health authorities for testing, treatment, and infection prevention and control.

The university takes very seriously its obligations and commitment to providing a safe and secure environment for all members of our university community, as well as visitors to our campuses. UB officials, in partnership with local and state public health officials, have taken steps to prepare for a potential case locally, including:

  • Ongoing Monitoring of CDC Monkeypox Advisories
  • Ongoing coordination with other campus groups, SUNY, ECDOH and NYSDOH
  • Assess and strengthen infection control measures and equipment
  • Outreach to the UB community regarding preventative measures and how to monitor for possible symptoms
  • Proactive planning for the management of a potential exposure or suspected case of monkeypox virus

UB continues to encourage students, employees and visitors to wash their hands regularly, to avoid contact with people who appear ill, and to contact their doctor or Student Health Services if they show signs of illness. a new unexplained rash or other symptoms.

People who have signs or symptoms consistent with monkeypox, such as rashes or characteristic sores, should contact their health care provider for a risk assessment. This includes anyone who has traveled to countries where cases of monkeypox have been reported or who has been in contact with someone with a similar rash, or who has been diagnosed with suspected or confirmed monkeypox. If a rash is present, people should cover their rashes and avoid close contact with anyone. If there is a fever, chills, or respiratory symptoms, they should self-isolate in their halls of residence or at home.

People who have been exposed to monkeypox but have no signs or symptoms do not need to be excluded from school or work, but should be actively monitored for signs and symptoms, which includes temperature measurement at least twice daily for 21 days after exposure. Before reporting to school or work each day, the person should self-screen for signs of fever or rash. If a person has a temperature of 100.4 and above, they should not report to school or work.

For students : Any student who has symptoms consistent with monkeypox, such as rashes or characteristic lesions, or who has been potentially exposed through direct contact with an infected person or animal, or an object that has been contaminated, should call the services student health.

For employees: Faculty or staff who have symptoms consistent with monkeypox, such as rashes or characteristic sores, or who have been potentially exposed should notify their supervisor or department head and call their primary health care provider immediately.

UB continues to encourage students, employees and visitors to wash their hands regularly, to avoid contact with people who appear ill and to contact their doctor or Student Health Services if they show signs of illness. .

  • Avoid close skin-to-skin contact with people who have a rash that looks like monkeypox.
    • Ask your sexual partners if they have a rash or other symptoms consistent with monkeypox.
    • Do not touch the rash or scabs of a person with monkeypox.
    • Do not kiss, hug, cuddle or have sex with someone who has monkeypox.
  • Avoid contact with objects and materials that a person with monkeypox has used.
    • Do not share utensils or cups with someone who has monkeypox.
    • Do not handle or touch the bedding, towels, or clothing of someone with monkeypox.
  • Wash your hands often.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, especially before eating or touching your face and after using the bathroom.[DB1]
  • Follow trusted sources of health information, including NYSDOH, CDCand your local county health department.
  • In Central and West Africa, avoid contact with animals that can spread the monkeypox virus, usually rodents and primates. Also, avoid sick or dead animals, as well as bedding or any other material they have touched.

To help prevent the spread of the virus, members of the UB community are reminded to follow these basic hygiene guidelines: Wash your hands often, avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth, do not share no personal items, do not share food or drink or cooking utensils, do not prepare food for others if you are sick, avoid sick people, and wash surfaces in your work area, including keyboards and telephones.

Calvin W. Soper