Dodgers news: Andy Pages, Landon Knack, robot umps in Triple-A

It’s prospect season, which comes in handy with a limited amount of other MLB news happening during a lockdown. This week alone, we had Baseball America’s Top 100 (or 101) Sports Lists and Baseball Prospectus, and BP also revealed its top 10 Dodgers prospects.

We also continued our series of community prospect rankings, with a profile from David Hood on outfielder James Outman, the recent 40-player addition who checked in with the team’s No. 10 True Blue LA prospect. .

So it’s only fitting that we begin our Saturday morning links with a few more notes on the Dodgers’ outlook.

Connections

  • Andy Pages is one of 15 players identified by Baseball America as finishing just outside of MLB’s top 100 prospects. “Benefiting from increased power and on-base ability, further refinement of his approach and bat-to-ball skills could see Pages make a rapid ascent into the Top 100,” wrote Geoff Pontes. This article also includes a list of the 103 unlisted players who received at least one BA vote to be in the top 100which included Pages, Landon Knack and Eddys Leonard.
  • Ben Badler chose 12 prospects who could enter the top 100 next year. Among them is Knack, who was drafted by the Dodgers in the second round in 2020, Badler wrote.
  • MLB plans to try automated balls and hits in select Triple-A stadiums in 2022, according to The Associated Press. The Oklahoma City Dodgers are among at least 11 teams for which the league has issued a notice of hiring employees to operate the automated system, which has already been piloted in the independent Atlantic League and the Arizona Fall League.
  • The job of major league general manager isn’t what it used to be, Jim Alexander wrote to the Orange County Register.
  • Mookie Betts is getting into online gaming.
  • As nostalgic as I am for Johnny Bench’s spray paint commercials – “No Drips, No Drips, No Mistakes” – I like FanGraphs’ Ben Clemens proposal to change the standard line score from baseball. “So let’s end the tyranny of error and remove it from the line scores. Let’s replace it with something better and walk around while we’re at it,” Clemens writes.

Calvin W. Soper